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ICRI Medical Tourism signs MoU with Chittagong Club
25th July, 2009


ICRI Global Research (Medical Tourism Division), on July 25, 2009 entered into an MoU with Dhaka Club Ltd for providing medical services to the club members. The services include treatment facilitation at the best hospitals, dental solutions, travel & accommodation services and wellness & rejuvenation packages in India.

Chittagong Club is also amongst the oldest clubs in Dhaka, Bangladesh with about 7 executive committee members and 1700 members. Established in the year 1878, Chittagong club has a celebrated golden history for the past 125 years. It has been responsible towards dynamic development of society which is well reflected in its different social activities and also creating atmosphere for the growth of business in Chittagong & Bangladesh. It is equipped with pleasing, eco friendly atmosphere and all modern facilities.

ICRI Medical Tourism, through its vast network in India will help the members and their families avail the various treatment facilities and dental services in India at the most viable rates. ICRI will also help them find the best travel and accommodation deals while they come to India for their treatment or rejuvenation.

To know more about The Chittagong Club: please visit: www.thechittagongclub.com

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ICRI Medical Tourism signs MoU with Uttara Ladies Club
21th July, 2009


ICRI Global Research (Medical Tourism Division), on July 21, 2009 entered into an MoU with Dhaka Club Ltd for providing medical services to the club members. The services include treatment facilitation at the best hospitals, dental solutions, travel & accommodation services and wellness & rejuvenation packages in India.

Dhaka Club is the oldest recreation organization and the largest of elite clubs in Dhaka, Bangladesh with about 11 executive committee members and 2300 members. Set over two hectares (five acres) in the heart of the Bangladeshi capital, the club, built in the style of a colonial bungalow, is one of only a handful of buildings in Dhaka surviving from the Raj era. ICRI Medical Tourism, through its vast network in India will help the members and their families avail the various treatment facilities and dental services in India at the most viable rates. ICRI will also help them find the best travel and accommodation deals while they come to India for their treatment or rejuvenation.

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ICRI Medical Tourism signs MoU with Uttara Ladies Club
18th July, 2009


ICRI Global Research (Medical Tourism Division), on July 18, 2009 entered into an MoU with Dhaka Club Ltd for providing medical services to the club members. The services include treatment facilitation at the best hospitals, dental solutions, travel & accommodation services and wellness & rejuvenation packages in India.

Uttara Ladies Club is also amongst the oldest clubs in Dhaka, Bangladesh with about 8 executive committee members and 260 members. Uttara Ladies Club, exceptional in its activities, carries out social welfare and development programmes alongside its regular activities. It has been running schools for poor children, a free clinic for the poor and a legal aid centre for the repressed women.

ICRI Medical Tourism, through its vast network in India will help the members and their families avail the various treatment facilities and dental services in India at the most viable rates. ICRI will also help them find the best travel and accommodation deals while they come to India for their treatment or rejuvenation.

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ICRI Medical Tourism signs MoU with Uttara Club, Dhaka.
11th July, 2009


ICRI Global Research (Medical Tourism Division), on July 11, 2009 entered into an MoU with Uttara Club Ltd for providing medical services to the club members. The services include treatment facilitation at the best hospitals, dental solutions, travel & accommodation services and wellness & rejuvenation packages in India.

The Uttara Club is one of the latest of the clubs that have come up in Dhaka and by now has its own premises on nearly 1.5 acres of land. The club has 11 executive committee members and 1400 members.

ICRI Medical Tourism, through its vast network in India will help the members and their families avail the various treatment facilities and dental services in India at the most viable rates. ICRI will also help them find the best travel and accommodation deals while they come to India for their treatment or rejuvenation.

To know more about Uttara Club: please visit - www.ucl.com.bd

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ICRI to teach healthcare management, iGovernment
11th July, 2008


New Delhi: The Institute of Clinical Research India (ICRI) has tied up with Academy of Hospital Administration (AHA) to start teaching healthcare management in the country.

The initiative is aimed at providing qualified manpower to the booming medical tourism sector in India, reports IANS.

"We wish to bring in a paradigm shift in the healthcare and wellness segment using the science of management and training to ensure continuity, maximise capacity and improve quality of care," ICRI Chairman S R Dugal said.

"India has a huge potential in terms of capability and quality and this is what we need to harness today in the healthcare and wellness segment," he added.

According to a McKinsey and the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) study, medical tourism in India has the potential to become a $1 billion business by 2012.

The government has predicted that India's $17-billion-a-year healthcare industry could grow 13 per cent in each of the next six years, boosted by medical tourism.

ICRI is one of India's leading clinical research institutes and currently operates out of Delhi, Mumbai, Ahmedabad, Kochi, Hyderabad and Bangalore.

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Educating To Lure Foreigners For Cures
10th July, 2008,


An Indian health education group has announced courses in hospital management and medical tourism-- intended to tap into a burgeoning healthcare industry at home and care-seekers from abroad.

From a ''few small charitable hospitals (to) world class corporate modern hospitals,'' India's healthcare industry ''has come a long way,'' Shiv Raman Dugal, chairman of the Institute of Clinical Research (India) told journalists this week.

The $17-billion-a-year-- and growing-- industry is estimated to employ four million people serving the needs of a sixth of world population suffering from a fifth of its ailments.

For the past four years, the Institute has been running a postgraduate clinical research course turning out professionals trained to conduct trials of new drugs, medical devices and procedures.

Dugal said the new courses would inject scientific management concepts and practices into hospital operations "hitherto handled by medical superintendents" as well as in medical tourism, which drew 150,000 travellers to India in 2004.

These courses will be administered by the Institute's newly created Health Division headed by Major General (retired) Munindra Srivastava.

Dr Srivastasva said monthly pay packages in healthcare industry could be as high as Rs 50,000 at entry level and Rs 1,50,000 to 2,50,000 for experienced professionals.

Institute officials say manpower deficiency in a booming healthcare industry underscores the need for scientific management with marketing strategies.

The bulk of India's healthcare spending is in private sector. It ranks 171st among 175 countries in Public Health Sector spending and 17th in Private Sector spending.

The spending has more than doubled in just over a decade from Rs 86,000 crore in 1991 to a projected Rs 200,000 crore in 2012-- Rs 156,000 crore of it in private sector.

Explaining medical tourism, Dr Srivastava said the idea was to provide state-of-the-art private medical care in collaboration with tourism industry to foreign patients at highly competitive prices compared to hospitals in the West.

Medical procedures in India cost a tenth or less of what they cost in the West. For instance, a metal-free dental bridge which costs $5,500 in the US, costs only $500 in India.

He said India was now a leading promoter of medical tourism moving into an era of 'medical outsourcing' with sub-contractors providing services to over-burdened and high priced Western facilities.

Experts say the concept dates back thousands of years when Greek pilgrims all over the Mediterranean travelled to a small territory in the Saronic Gulf called Epidauria-- home of the healer god Asklepios. Spa towns and sanitariums were also early form of medical tourism, they say.

Institute officials see medical and health tourism as ''the next big success story of India,'' packaging medical treatment with recuperative leisure at resorts.

Besides high prices and insurance complications, Western destinations such as Britain and Canada pose long waiting periods.

In Canada, for instance, as many as 782,936 patients waited for procedures in 2005, they said.

A study commissioned by the Confederation of Indian Industry showed that 1.3 million medical tourists visit Asia annually and some 710,000 Americans seek cheaper care abroad.

The Institute says India ''has some of the best corporate hospitals and treatment centres in the world''-- with hospital infrastructure and technology on a par with the United States and Britain.

At least for now, there is no waiting period and a 98.7 per cent procedure success rate as compared to 97.5 per cent in the U S.

Asked how the Institute will equip graduates to deal with such trends as illegal kidney transplants or unauthorised drug-testing, Brigadier (retired) Dr K S Bhatnagar, a course consultant, said the curriculum includes studies on Law and Health.

The goal, according to an Institute brochure, is to meet ''the growing demand of skilled clinical research professionals in the future... with a primary focus on promoting ethical research.'' The issue of ethics arises owing to reports from time to time of drug-makers testing new concoctions without adequate approvals or accountability.

Asked whether an upsurge in clinical testing activity might raise the risk of patient or subject abuse, Institute spokesmen cited steps taken by the Indian Council of Medical Research to promote ethics.

Last year, the Council launched a Registry for Clinical Trials aimed at transparency in such trials and consequent requirements that any adverse effects be treated and subjects compensated-- not left in the lurch.

But the Council Registry is a voluntary affair, not a requirement, implying that trials might still be conducted without its knowledge, albeit journals may not publish such findings.

Experts say that is hardly a consolation to any victims should unregistered experiments fail or induce harm.

They say that while schools can instill correct values, a far more effective role has to be played by regulation through meaningful laws and enforcement.

According to published sources, drug corporations which have to reckon with strict regulatory norms or legal actions in, for instance, the United States, eye India, with its millions of untreated patients, as an advantageous ''resource.'' For instance, California-based iGATE Corporation, listed among top clinical research global outsourcers, says India ''represents a largely untapped resource for clinical trials.'' Among pluspoints, it cites are huge patient base, diversity of diseases, heterogeneous population mix, drug naïve population, high enrollment rates, state-of-the-art hospital facilities, reliable, well-trained, experienced investigators, competitive costs and ''increasingly accommodating'' regulatory environment.

A morbidity list for India put out by iGATE includes 40 million asthmatic patients, 34 million diabetic patients, 8-10 million people HIV positive, eight million epileptic patients, three million cancer patients, two million cardiac related deaths, 1.5 million Alzheimer's victims, 15 per cent of population is hypertensive and one per cent suffer from schizophrenia.

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